Moon☾❍

62 º of a Frosty MoonBut rather brings an added lightthere's a m❍❍n ❍ut t❍night, wh❍a-❍h-❍h ❍❍❍November's waxing (giant;) Moon"Whatever a moon has always meant and whatever a sun will always sing is you.." April's Pink Moon✈ me 2 the ☽ .... ♬
Moon and frost of the morning's lightI'm not in love it's just a silly phase I'm g◑ing thr◑ugh..Like the circles that you findThe moon looks upon many night flowers; the night flowers see but one moon.oOo Selena .. how I wish I could..A silver goddess; a reflection a mirage, a recollection..
Jack frost and Selena...Lacy by the light of the Wolf MoonFull Wolf  ❍ ~December's full moon on the rise..Waxing MoonThink pink ..In this balancing act of life, hope abides
Flower Moon of MayFlower MoonMoody Moon ❤ Dedicated to my Mom!Moody MoonMoonshine through the PalmsMoon river..

☾❍ Moon, a set on Flickr.

Photographs © M’sheArt2 PhotoGraphy.  All rights reserved. 2007- 2013

Sonnet of the Moon

Look how the pale Queen of the silent night doth cause the ocean to attend..

“May the sun
bring you new energy by day
May the moon
softly restore you by night
May the rain
wash away your worries
May the breeze
blow new strength into your being
May you walk
gently through the world and know
its beauty all the days of your life.”
— Apache Blessing

edited to add this Evolution of the Moon video from Nasa Youtube page.

http://youtu.be/UIKmSQqp8wY

May has come …

Repose...
Originally uploaded by M’sheArt2.

“The wind is tossing the lilacs,
The new leaves laugh in the sun,
And the petals fall on the orchard wall,
But for me the spring is done.

Beneath the apple blossoms
I go a wintry way,
For love that smiled in April
Is false to me in May.”

– Sara Teasdale, May

“I awoke this morning with devout thanksgiving for my friends, the old and the new.”

itle by — Ralph Waldo Emerson

A little fella or filly finds a Peanut, bringing it up to the nest ( thank goodness no longer in my soffit

“Thanksgiving Day, a function which originated in New England two or three centuries ago when those people recognized that they really had something to be thankful for — annually, not oftener — if they had succeeded in exterminating their neighbors, the Indians, during the previous twelve months instead of getting exterminated by their neighbors, the Indians. Thanksgiving Day became a habit, for the reason that in the course of time, as the years drifted on, it was perceived that the exterminating had ceased to be mutual and was all on the white man’s side, consequently on the Lord’s side; hence it was proper to thank the Lord for it and extend the usual annual compliments.”
— Mark Twain